Monday, April 17, 2017

Nurturing Owl Parents #AtoZChallenge

"Then nightly sings the staring owl, Tu-whit; Tu-who, a merry note."
-- William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost

A pair of burrowing owls built their home adjacent to our driveway in Puerto López. During the first few weeks, when anyone walked or drove past, they flew away.

They slowly began remaining at the entrance to their home and monitoring us instead of fleeing. Soon cars, trucks, mototaxis and motorcycles drove by while they held their ground. They guarded the entrance, ever watchful.
Burrowing owl pair adjacent to our driveway
Puerto López, Ecuador
One often hunted while the other guarded the entrance.
Burrowing owl guarding entrance
Puerto López, Ecuador
Walking down the driveway one day, we realized that there were three of them! Their baby had come out of the burrow and was almost the same size as the adults.

Over the next few weeks, the parents took the young one flying further and further from home. They went hunting together and out for nighttime jaunts. In no time, the baby was off on his own.

They were good, nurturing owl parents.

Have you watched wild creatures raise their young?

If you are visiting from the #AtoZChallenge please include your blog link in a comment so I can check it out.

20 comments:

  1. Neat! We have a pair of nuthatches that come back to nest in an old tree trunk each year. Find me here. LINK

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    1. How fun to have the nuthatches come back to the same old tree trunk each year!

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  2. They are so cute! I wish we had them here, I would love to watch like you did...

    The Multicolored Diary: WTF - Weird Things in Folktales

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    1. They are so fun to watch!

      I have been looking forward to your Ecuador folktale post - going to read it now :)

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  3. I love burrowing owls, had no idea they were also in Ecuador. Thanks for sharing!

    DB McNicol, author & traveler | Oh, the places we will go! | N: New England & New Orleans

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    1. They also sometimes burrow on the beach, above high tide. Some friends in Puerto Cayo have a pair on their property. They frequently have owls in their sunset photos.

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  4. Hi Emily - I knew about burrowing owls ... but hadn't seen them or read about their life-style - they certainly seem like excellent parents - how lovely for you to be able to watch them ... cheers Hilary

    http://positiveletters.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/n-is-for-notable-rare-breeds-natives.html

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    1. I had heard of them before they moved in but learned everything else after they arrived.

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  5. Very cool. You took some awesome photos - those owl eyes! I never knew about the borrowing owl species. They appear to be very nurturing. (Good take on the N - what about O for tomorrow?) I'll have to come back and see. My Virtual Vineyard

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    1. Thanks Val! O was one of the only topics I immediately knew when I signed up for the AtoZ challenge. Thanks for stopping by and do come back tomorrow!

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  6. I've never seen burrowing owls other than in photos. How fabulous you got to experience them up close and personal! And what sweet photos you posted - quite delightful.

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    1. It was a wonderful experience that I wish everyone could have. Thank you Deborah!

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  7. In 2016 we were parked at Sun Life RV Resort in Mesa, AZ and had an OWL NEST above our motorhome space. Here is a Facebook link and caption to a video I shot.

    https://www.facebook.com/judy.rinehimer/videos/vb.100001114812438/971870296193455/?type=2&theater

    The first :10 seconds of this video shows more OWL WING FLAPPING. Actually, all three owlets were flapping at sunset but I could not capture it. Mom and Dad were watching from across the street . — watching Great Hooting Owl nest at Sun Life RV Resort.

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    1. Great job getting the video and thanks for sharing it - love how wide the wingspan gets! How fun to have them right above you.

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  8. We have watched a lot of different birds raise their babies, but never owls. What a neat experience!
    Discarded Darlings - Jean Davis, Speculative Fiction Writer, A to Z: Editing Fiction

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    1. Watching any wild creature raise babies is special but I will admit these owls gave me a bit of extra excitement.

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  9. I hope someday that my human kids can be so independent!

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  10. Magical. I guess they are diurnal not nocturnal owls? Maui Jungalow

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    1. They are nocturnal but remain on alert during their daytime rest. Before their young one was in their burrow, they spent days inside the burrow. Once the young one was there, they rested more outside the entrance and spent some of their daytime hunting. Perhaps they needed to feed the infant frequently. We did still see them hunting during the night.

      Guess new burrowing owl parents get about as much sleep as new human parents :)

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