Thursday, April 27, 2017

Water. Clean Drinking Water #AtoZChallenge

Drinking tap water in coastal Ecuador is a great way to get parasites. Or worse.
-- EJB

A few weeks after the April 16, 2016 7.8 Ecuador earthquake, Tennessee pastor Gary Vance arrived in Puerto López. He had a suitcase full of water filters and a plan - provide clean drinking water for those who needed it.
Clean water welcomed in a tent camp
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
He offered to install a water filter for the Olón orphanage. We went there the next morning. Gary installed a filter and trained a thrilled staff on maintaining it.
Water filter installed at the Olón Orphanage
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
Gary spent the rest of that trip traveling, making contacts, and installing filters in tent camps and communities throughout the earthquake damaged area.
Filters installed in a camp
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance

Gary was already planning his return trip and negotiating bulk filter pricing before he flew home. He founded the Tears2Water charity to "quench the thirst of victims of the earthquake devastation in Ecuador."
Gary's suitcase full of filters is behind him in this photo
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
Gary has made six trips to Ecuador since the earthquake, spent 88 days in country, delivered 1000 filters, and documented over 5000 people who have gained filtered water.
Clean water!
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
He trains local partners who install filters and train communities on proper use.
Filter installation
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
Each filter provides enough water for 100 people per day. Small communities may only need one filter for all of their clean water needs.
Buckets with filters attached
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
Elizabeth (pink shirt) training people on their filter buckets
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance

Bringing new filter bucket home
Photo courtesy of Gary Vance
Gary's seventh visit is in a few weeks. It won't be his last. Donate HERE to help.

Did you ever begin a small project that turned into a passion?

If you are visiting from the #AtoZChallenge please include your blog link in a comment so I can check it out.

Related posts: Earthquake, Post-Earthquake

42 comments:

  1. Wow! Respect for that guy for figuring out a way to help. Clean water is so often taken for granted...

    The Multicolored Diary: WTF - Weird Things in Folktales

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  2. The spirit of selfless service of men like pastor Gary is truly inspirational. Lovely post.
    Best wishes,
    https://aslifehappens60.wordpress.com

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  3. Now that's a useful thing. Water is often the first thing affected in a big disaster.

    --Her Grace, Heidi from Romance Spinners

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    1. You are right, water is often the first thing affected and water from rivers sickens people already suffering from the disaster. Gary jumped in with both feet to help with that.

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  4. What a fantastic act of service and to fulfill such a basic human need is beyond honourable. He is a very good man!
    Leanne | cresting the hill

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  5. This is fantastic! It gave me chills. There is nothing more vital than clean water. Thank you for sharing. I can't say I have ever done anything half so noble.

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    1. Thank you, Darla. I may have at least somewhat conveyed how wonderful his work has been if it gave you chills. :)

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  6. This is such an uplifting and humbling post Emily. Great job Gary and team. We take clean water and the fact that it's available so easily for granted. Thank you for this post today.
    W is for Warp and Weft

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    1. Thank you Arti. Gary and his team are quietly doing great work. I am honored to be able to shine a spotlight on them.

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  7. No, but this is awesome. I'm glad I steered this way; I love hearing these uplifting stories. And some people sneer at humanity. Here's a wonderful example of the potential great goodness that's ingrained in our bones. We only have to dig to find it. ^_^

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    1. I'm glad you steered this way, too, Marna :) My opinion is that we don't hear these uplifting stories more often is because those performing the work do not self promote. They are too focused on doing good work.

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  8. That is such an awesome story. Thank you for sharing, Emily. Water is taken for granted by so many people, and yet others die from the lack of it. Praise God for the pastor and for all who help him. W is for Watch the Wordcount as you Build a Better Blog. #AtoZchallenge.

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    1. My pleasure, Shirley. Gary's efforts and ones like his should be spotlighted and I am happy to provide one.

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  9. This is such a heartwarming tale - what a unique passion and fortitude of this man to think of others and provide such a basic necessity whichi we all take for granted.
    Visit my blog for the Pergrination Chronicles as I meander through the AtoZchallenge where I am telling travel tales by the alphabet!!

    ​Wish upon the stars

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    1. His passion for providing clean water is amazing.

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  10. I have never undertaken anything as helpful as this. Great project, thanks for highlighting it today.

    Phillip | W is for White Shapes | What do you see?

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    1. Most of us haven't, Philip. I enjoyed writing about such a wonderful project.

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  11. It's wonderful to hear about grassroots efforts like this -- we need more of them! I wonder if his system would work in Detroit?

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    1. Good thinking, Molly, they should work there. He uses highly-portable Sawyer International filters and Detroit probably would not need portable ones. If an apartment building had a community faucet, they could all share one filter.

      Here's what the tears2water website says:
      "We use a highly-portable water filter from Sawyer International, developed from dialysis medical technology, that filters down to 0.1 micron. This means that the filter totally removes the bad bugs — such as cholera, e-coli, salmonella, and giardia. As a practical bonus, it’s quite easy to install, operate, and maintain. Most importantly, a single filter can produce water for up to one hundred (100) people a day — potentially providing a million gallons of life-saving water (Hydreion Labs Report)."

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  12. We take clean water for granted here, It's amazing what giving a community clean water can do for them.

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  13. Props to Gary (Gary has made six trips to Ecuador since the earthquake, spent 88 days in country, delivered 1000 filters, and documented over 5000 people who have gained filtered water.)

    He's one very hard work. May all blessings come to him.
    theglobaldig.blogspot.com

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    1. Absolutely, Jean. He had a vision and has made it reality for many, with more filters on the way.

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  15. Hi Emily - wonderful project put into action and followed through and up with more visits by Gary - incredible and so good to read about - inspirational. Water is so important to us all - we are just so lucky with ours - but at least Gary with his foundation is helping those in need ... thanks for his work ... Hilary

    http://positiveletters.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/x-is-for-x-war-facts.html

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    1. I agree Hilary - Gary's work is inspirational.

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  16. would you mind if I used your story in my Sunday School lesson on Sunday? I will give you credit - it fits perfectly with "do something"

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    1. Absolutely you can use it - that sounds like a perfect use for this story, Lisa. You can find more of the story on the Tears2Water Facebook page, too. https://www.facebook.com/Tears2Water/

      Thank you!

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  17. What a wonderful project!
    In Switzerland we are blessed with plenty of excellent quality water so we can't even imagine what it must be like not to have access to it.

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    1. It really is a wonderful project, Tamara! The work Gary and his team are doing is making such a difference in many lives.

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  18. Hi Emily!
    Thank you for visiting my blog.
    The Tears2Water charity is an awesome project! This post is a perfect fit for the We Are The World Blogfest.
    If you sign up for the blogfest, you can use this post again.

    We drink water directly from our taps. Drinking water here in South Africa is fairly safe to drink and cook with when taken from taps in urban areas.
    Whether it will remain this way is another story...

    It's lovely to meet you via the A to Z Challenge!
    Writer In Transit

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    1. Hi Michelle, Thanks for coming over to check this post out.

      I look forward to joining the We Are The World Blogfest! This will be my first post for it.

      Lovely meeting you, too!

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  19. What a blessed project! Water is the life blood of the world.

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  20. Sometimes I wonder if one person can make a difference - your story reminds me they can! Beautiful ministry!!

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    1. Yes Nancy, Gary has taught us that one person can make a huge difference!

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