Friday, June 30, 2017

3D Technology Helping Animals in Cuenca, Ecuador #WATWB

Welcome to June's installment of the We Are The World Blogfest, where we share positive stories on the last Friday of each month. The basic rules are:
  • Keep the post below 500 words. 
  • Link to a human news story that shows love, humanity, and brotherhood and share an excerpt.
  • No story is too big or small as long as it goes beyond religion and politics.
Thank you to this month's WATWB hosts: Belinda Witzenhausen,  Lynn Hallbrooks,  Michelle WallaceSylvia McGrath, and Sylvia Stein.

I have selected a story found in the Cuenca Dispatch about veterinarian Johnny Uday and electronics engineer and robotics expert Gabriel Delgado, who have brought 3D imaging to injured animals in Cuenca, Ecuador. I may be stretching the rules since this is more of an animal news story but I am an animal lover and I am human, hence, human news story.

Imagine being a bird with a broken beak and trying to break down foods before eating them. I am amazed that a prosthetic beak can be printed using 3D technology.

In addition to prosthetic parts, they are providing cast-like exoskeletons on injured limbs to allow body parts to heal properly.

Prosthetic Beak
From Cuenca Dispatch, Issue 45



From the article:
Animals in Cuenca who have suffered bone fractures or have lost body parts, can now count on a new opportunity to have a normal life. The Ideo company is now fabricating prosthesis or shell-like exoskeletons for missing or damaged animal body parts. Veterinarian Johnny Uday is responsible for bringing Ideo's products to Ecuador. After finishing his post-graduate studies in Australia, where he was first introduced to the technology, he wanted to introduce it here to Cuenca. 

“I started to look for someone who could help me materialize this idea”, he says. Uday found Gabriel Delgado, an electronics engineer and robotic expert who specializes in 3D printing. Uday and Delgado have been working together since last December to create the first prototypes for trial use here in Cuenca. So far, they have managed to help two dogs, a bird and a disabled cat by designing pieces of body-parts to give them an easier life.
From Cuenca Dispatch, Issue 45
Before creating one of these unique prosthetics for any animal, Uday does a complete evaluation of the animal to verify its over all condition, and to judge whether the animal will accept the prosthetics. Some animals simply won't allow their owners to put a prosthetic on them.


14 comments:

  1. Hi Emily - isn't that wonderful ... this fits the bill perfectly ... human - very!! and looking after those amazing creatures who need some help to get on with life ... and who offer us so much ...

    Fascinating project - love it ... cheers and thanks for letting us know about this ... Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for your kind comments Hilary!

      Delete
  2. It's always a joy to see love and compassion extended to all beings sharing this planet with us! And this is such an exciting example of cutting-edge use of 3D-printing! What a wonderful post - I'm so glad you shared.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Deborah, I am certainly impressed that they are using the 3D printing technology for this, too!

      Delete
  3. As an animal person, this to me is simply brilliant. Kudos to Mr. Uday! Thanks so much for sharing this! #WATWB

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wonderful. I love animals and seeing them helped this way heals my heart.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is so fabulous Emily thank you .. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think this is awesome. Medicine and Technology combining to help our animal friends. Thanks so much for sharing and for being a part of #WATWB

    ReplyDelete
  7. 3D tech is getting better all the time. If it can enhance life then, fabulous. And yes, I've always had a soft spot for critters. Some beautiful pictures there too, Emily. Thanks for sharing this Simon’s Still Stanza #WATWB

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is amazing what can be done with 3D technology. When 3D printing first became available, I never had any inkling that it could turn into something like this. Thanks Simon for stopping by.

      Delete