Friday, September 29, 2017

Messages of Solidarity from Ecuador to Mexico After Earthquakes #WATWB

“The healing power of even the most microscopic exchange with someone who knows in a flash precisely what you're talking about because she experienced that thing too cannot be overestimated.” 


Welcome to September's installment of the We are the World Blogfest, where we share positive news on the last Friday of each month. Thank you to this month's WATWB co-hosts: Michelle Wallace, Shilpa Garg, Andrea Michaels, Peter Nena, and Emerald Barnes.

Once your life has been turned upside down by a natural disaster and you have recovered, you are in a unique position to assist those who have theirs turned upside down by a similar one.



This month, Mexico suffered a pair of devastating earthquakes, first an 8.1 on September 7, then a 7.1 on September 19. Much of the world sent aid. I am writing about this article on Andres Drouet, a priest from Manta, Ecuador who organized aid for Mexico. It caught my attention because Manta is the city I visited with post-earthquake makeshift camps in 2016 (you can read that post here).

Messages of solidarity written on cans of tuna, bags of dry goods, and toiletries let those suffering know that they are not alone. Ecuadorians remember receiving similar messages from Mexico following the Ecuador earthquake.

Messages of Solidarity from Ecuador on donations for Mexico
Image from TeleSUR article

From the article:

Coastal Ecuador, after suffering one of its worst earthquakes that killed more than 600 people, is sending aid to Mexico after its own recent quake.  

Following Mexico's natural disaster, Andres Drouet, a priest from Manta who experienced the 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Ecuador last year, organized his community to join the rescue effort.

"This solidarity is born because we lived the same thing and we know how terrible it is," Drouet told teleSUR. "We've had the experience of an earthquake and know of the necessities that arise immediately after it." 

People who brought donations included small messages of hope, like "Ecuador Is With You" and "Be Strong Mexico." Donors sending aid to Ecuador following its own earthquake wrote similar messages.


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24 comments:

  1. I love this. Such a simple way to effectively let other people know that they are not alone or forgotten-- in a spiritual sense. Great story.

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    1. Thanks Ally! It does help to know one is not forgotten even when it feels that way.

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  2. First-hand experience enables us to empathize with others going through the same thing. We know exactly what they are feeling...
    What a wonderful way for Ecuador to pay-it-forward...by giving back to Mexico who was there when Ecuador suffered the same crisis.
    Thank you for sharing.

    Writer In Transit
    #WATWB #InDarknessBeLight

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    1. Exactly, Michelle! No need to attempt to "walk a mile in their shoes" when one already has. Thanks for co-hosting!

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  3. Thanks Emily for this wonderfully inspiring story. Bless Andres Drouet forever for organising relief and to all the Ecaudorians helping out with aid - and to the Mexican people who were on the receiving end ...

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    1. Thank you Susan. I agree, bless all of those involved on both ends.

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  4. Hi Emily - this is so uplifting the example of the Mexicans helping the Ecuadorians, set the bar for the Ecuadorians to repeat the idea after these recent Mexican earthquakes. I love the idea of the little notes packed in with each 'gift' ... just a delight to read. Thank you - cheers Hilary

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    1. The notes are such a great idea - it adds a nice personal sentiment just when someone might need to read one. Thanks so much Hilary!

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  5. Sometimes we understand best after going through things ourselves. Kudos to those who remember and reciprocate.

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  6. Thoroughly enjoyed reading your uplifting post, Emily. How compassionate, to leave comforting notes along with much needed supplies. Also read your previous post about your post-earthquake makeshift camps, awesome. Since I remember your post from last month, I expected something equally inspirational. I was not disappointed. Also, thanks for leaving a comment on my blog earlier today!

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind and generous comment, Lizbeth! I do love uplifting stories and watch for them even more now because of WATWB.

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  7. Such an inspiring, simple and amazing way to show solidarity with people who have suffered so much due to natural calamities. Truly heart-warming!! Thanks for sharing, Emily!

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    1. So simple and something we can all add to donated goods. Thanks Shilpa!

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  8. This is such a great way to make the help personal! Often when one goes through the same can appreciate what thus means. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Yes, I like how it makes it personal, too. Thanks for dropping by and commenting Miss Andi!

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  9. Brilliant story! Such an small act but so profound for those suffering. Having been through it themselves they have first hand experience and went that little bit extra to show them that people care. Thank you so much for sharing this and for being part of #WATWB!

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    1. I like your condensed version, Belinda - small but profound. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  10. Thank you for sharing this beautiful story with us Emily. The earthquake in Mexico shook the whole world with its viciousness. I'm sure it's been very very hard on the people and the economy of Mexico too. We all pray for things to return to normal as soon as possible. God bless them all.

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    1. Many people there are still wondering what will become of their life, where will they live, what will they do, etc. There is a long road ahead. Yes, we all pray for things to return to normal as soon as possible. Thank you Pradita!

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  11. Such a positive and uplifting way to share with others. Thanks for sharing and for being a part of #WATWB

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    1. Thank you Lynn and thank you for sharing my post, too!

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  12. Emily, I continue to be moved by how people's compassion grows after tragedy and that they reach out to others - from Ecuador to Mexico. And that they write little messages upon the cans of tuna etc, such a thoughtful way to link each other. A really good story in such tumultuous times for them. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. I agree, the messages are a nice, thoughtful way to link the giver and receiver, both knowing the other is thinking about them. Thank you Simon, for visiting and commenting!

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