Saturday, April 28, 2018

Yellow Orb Over Puerto Lopez, Ecuador #AtoZChallenge


A Yellow Orb (YO) arrives every morning in Puerto Lopez at 6:30, dazzling us with it’s beauty. It silently preys on our eagerness to celebrate beneath it.

It’s primary victims are tourists, freshly arrived from cooler climates, where they have been protected by clothing for months. They arrive, strip off most of their fabric and offer their skin up to the YO. Some forget Ecuador is named for the equator.

Did you know?

The Earth is closer to the sun at the equator than elsewhere because of our planet's Equatorial Bulge. As it spins, the Earth forms an oblate spheroid rather than a sphere. Sea level at the equator is 21.36 km closer to the sun than sea level at either pole. Read more about the Equatorial Bulge on Wikipedia here


Protect yourself


Do not allow yourself to be burned by the YO!

  • Wear a wide brimmed hat.
  • Use strong sunscreen (waterproof if you are going in the ocean).
  • Avoid it’s strongest hours – 12:00 to 4:00. 
  • If you are hiking during those high-risk hours, in addition to the hat and sunscreen, consider wearing long sleeved, light, breathable clothing.
  • Follow the example set by animals and relax in the shade.


The YO also helps people rediscover their sweat glands and dehydration is a concern. Carry water with you on your treks. There are no stores on trails or islands around Puerto Lopez, only the YO, flora and fauna.

Just as it arrives each morning, the YO departs each evening at 6:30.



How do you protect yourself from the YO? Have you ever been burned by it?


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A look back


Last year, I wrote Yuletide at the Olon Orphanage.
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30 comments:

  1. I wish we had to worry about the yellow orb here, it is a bit of a stranger!
    https://iainkellywriting.com/2018/04/28/y-is-for-ypres-belgium/

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    1. I am sure you would be happy to take precautions if only you could see the thing! Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Iain.

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  2. I live in a place where the Yellow orb is formidable - love the sun and its rises and sets. Super photos and write up celebrating the sun!

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    1. Yes, the celebrated sun and it's rises and sets are fantastic. Thank you for stopping by and commenting, Nila!

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  3. Thank you for the YO Departure picture!
    And yes, having been sick as a dog in Hawaii because I didn't drink enough water...HYDRATE!

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    1. Thank you for offering an example, Jz yet sorry you were able to provide one. Glad you enjoyed the YO departure pic! Thanks much!

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  4. Nice!
    Beth
    https://bethlapinsatozblog.wordpress.com/2018/04/28/yarn/

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  5. What a clever Y! Well done. Beautiful photos. Nearly done! 2nd last letter of the alphabet in the 2018 A to Z Blogging Challenge. Y is for Yes!

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    1. Thank you, Shirley! With only one letter left, we must be able to finish, right? Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  6. Thanks to your spot on the equator, you travel a whole lot farther in space every day than I do in Florida. You're one fast lady!

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    1. It's a wonder we aren't flung off into space, DC! Ha ha!

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

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  7. I love your creativity with this post (yellow orb for Y). :)

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  8. Thank you for sharing this. Too many people ignore the dangers of the Yellow Orb. The long term effects can be lethal. When enjoyed safely, the Yellow Orb is a beautiful thing. Sunscreen and covering up is a must.
    Facing Cancer with Grace

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    1. I figured if I did it in a bit of a lighthearted way, more might read it. Doctors here frequently mention the dangers and say melanoma is too common due to people not using sunscreen. Thankfully they are helping spread the word. Most people who work outside during the most dangerous hours wear long sleeves, long pants and hats. I just hope they drink enough water. Thanks very much, Heather!

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  9. Wow, what an amazing adventure you're having living by the equator. I for one didn't even think that's what Ecuador meant. duh! on me. Best wishes to you.
    The View from the Top of the Ladder

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    1. I am having a wonderful time, Su-sieee! You are not alone - many people do not know Ecuador being named for the equator. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  10. Love your choice of Yellow Orb and how kind of it to pose for such lovely pictures. I'm simultaneously laughing at myself and shaking my head at my ignorance. I knew day/night were approximately equal at the equator, but I didn't really grasp that the sunrise and set didn't vary. You can rest assured that your series on Ecuador has been educating me on all sorts of matters. :-)

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    1. I am so happy to hear that you have learned a bit about Ecuador - I met my goal. :)

      It was very kind of the YO to pose. When I mention that our days and nights are about the same length as each other year round, many people are initially surprised. Then they say "Of course they are!" So you have lots of company, Deborah. Thanks so much for your kind comments!

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  11. YO sounds so cool. Better than the sun. Perhaps, it's a good thing to call him YO on the equator. He'll probably feel less hot:)
    Gorgeous picture of the setting YO Emily.
    Y is for Yartsa Gunbu

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    1. YO is one of those friends you love but are not sure you want to spend ALL day with. Better to spend time with them in moments here and there throughout the day. Thanks so much Arti!

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  12. Gorgeous photos! Living in Cuenca as we did, we were always cautious of our exposure to the sun at that altitude.

    Donna B. McNicol|Author and Traveler
    A to Z Flash Fiction Stories | A to Z of Goldendoodles

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    1. As you say, Cuenca's altitude brings you even closer to the sun. It is good that you were cautious with your exposure. Thank you, Donna!

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  13. Enjoyed knowing about the equatorial sun - we get plenty of sunshine in India. Not sure if it qualifies for this.

    Seema, participant in #AtoZchallenge, Artist, Writer, Wanderer, and Dreamer.
    Yearning for a Boat Ride on Chilika Lake – Panthanivas, Satpada

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    1. Anywhere the sun shines qualifies, Seema. Absolutely somewhere that gets as much as India. Thank you for stopping by and commenting!

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  14. Wow! That's amazing. Look at that color.

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    1. Thank you, Ally! I scrolled through my sunrise and sunset photos until I found those with the most yellow. :)

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  15. Hi Emily - gosh it must be strange having sunrise and sunset at similar times every day ... all year. Lovely information ... I particularly liked the 'oblate spheroid' - I'm getting 'burnt' here ... and I'm only a few degrees south of being in southern England - cheers Hilary

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    1. I thought it would be strange having sunrise and sunset at the same time, too. It is actually wonderful. All year, having the light and dark cycles be equal and never changing seems to agree with me. Remember sunscreen! Even on cloudy days. Thanks for all of your support, Hilary.

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